Museum of Everything: A Treasure Trove in Primrose Hill

Nek Chand, Cloth Figures, c. 1980

Celebrity-filled Primrose Hill will soon have a new attraction: the quirky Museum of Everything.

Located down a side street in a former dairy and recording studio, the Museum of Everything is well worth seeking out.

Set up by collector James Brett, the museum is a showcase for art created outside the mainstream.

There are works by disabled artists, eccentrics, and people who feel the need to create things for their own reasons.

There is a celebrity connection too: much of the work is endorsed by celebs ranging from Jarvis Cocker and Nick Cave to Grayson Perry and Peter Blake.

You enter through what looks like the door of a tower block, to find yourself in a cosy cafe, where you can buy tea served in mis-matched cups and saucers.

There’s also a shop, in the style of the big museum shops, selling Museum of Everything merchandise.

The gallery spaces range from a cavernous warehouse to a small, dark room styled to look like a chapel.

Highlights include colourful figures by Indian roadworker Nek Chand, disturbing fairytale illustrations by American recluse Henry Darger (David Byrne is a fan), and weird pre-teen mannequins by amateur sculptor Morton Bartlett (selected by Turner Prize-winner Grayson Perry).

There’s also a series of talks and events featuring art world luminaries like Jarvis Cocker and Serpentine Gallery director Hans Ulrich Obrist.

The museum falls into the “pop-up” category. When I visited the organisers weren’t sure exactly how long it would be open for, but hoped it would be there until Christmas.

Make sure you check it out while you can!

The Museum of Everything opens on 14 October. Entrance is free.

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  1. Lilac says:

    It sounds great – can’t wait for it to open!

  2. Carinya says:

    Just been to visit the Museum of Everything, it’s really worth a visit.

    A great selection of raw, unusual and amazing art from some unusual and amazing people. Something different – and in Primrose Hill, who’d have thought!

    I’d recommend allowing more time than a quick lunch-hour visit though, it’s bigger than you think… and you might want to save time for a cuppa in the cafe!

  3. jottadotcom says:

    They’ve made use of the space in really interesting ways. Their series of talks was also something quite special. It’s good to see a ‘natural’ space being used for the show, arranged sympathetically to the creators’ intentions…
    http://www.jotta.com/magazine/articles/401/the-museum-of-everything

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